Richard Lindner Prints

Lindner's career began as an art director for a publishing firm in Munich until he was forced to flee Nazi Germany in 1933. After moving first to Paris, Lindner settled in New York in 1941, where he became a highly successful illustrator for magazines including 'Vogue' and 'Harper's Bazaar'. He began painting seriously in 1952, holding his first one-man exhibit in 1954. Lindner was strongly affected by the satirical art of George Grosz and Otto Dix and by the German dada movement. His style blends a mechanistic cubism with personal images and haunting symbolism and establishes a connection between the metaphysical tradition and pop art. He used flat areas of rich, sometimes garish, colors separated by hard edges, to present ambiguous perspective. Lindner's characters - the women, precocious children and men who could be strangers or voyeurs - often are posed in slice-of-life scenes. But these scenes are obsessive, rather than normal visions. His favorite subject was bizarre women. Corsets and straps emphasize their sexual qualities. Lindner professed no hatred of women; instead, he said, "I feel sorry for women. When I dress women in these corsets and contraptions in my painting, it's kind of the way I see them wrapping themselves up." Lindner is internationally acclaimed and his works are in the collections of museums worldwide.

Circle and Pillow from the "After Noon" Portfolio

Fun City NYC

Fifth Avenue

NY Men (Fun City)


Man's Best Friend from the "After Noon" Portfolio

Heart from the "After Noon" Portfolio

On (New York City)

St. Marks