Artist / Artwork
The villa of Brutus in Tivoli - Albert Christoph Dies prints
The villa of Brutus in Tivoli - Albert Christoph Dies prints
The villa of Brutus in Tivoli - Albert Christoph Dies prints
The villa of Brutus in Tivoli - Albert Christoph Dies prints

The villa of Brutus in Tivoli

By Albert Christoph Dies

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The villa of Brutus in Tivoli - Albert Christoph Dies print

Albert Christoph Dies
1794

Contact Fichter Kunsthandel about The villa of Brutus in Tivoli By Albert Christoph Dies

Date: 1794

Medium: etching

Edition size: limited

Image size: 24,5 x 35 cm

Sheet size: 39,1 x 49,3 cm

Condition: pristine

Signature: signed

Price: €500 (incl. taxes)

Description:

signed, dated and inscribed in the plate: "A. C. Dies fece Roma 1794" and inscribed: "Avanzi della Villa di M. Bruto a Tivoli". Albrecht Christoph Dies, a landscape painter from Hanover, is often described as an autodidact who turned to painting without an academic education as an artist. In 1775, at the age of 20, after a rudimentary education with an unknown painter, he decided, apparently "spontaneously" (Schmid 1998, p.162), to expand his wanderings in the German-speaking area to Italy. In the same year he settled in Rome and engaged in the colouring of engravings in the renowned Roman veduta workshops of Piranesi, Durcos and Volpato. Occasional works such as copying popular artists trained him further in painting and sharpened his eye for the landscape paintings of Jacob Philipp Hackert. This also followed his idea of realistic landscape portraits in the etchings shown here. The section of the picture was deliberately chosen picturesquely, as it was important to the artist above all to reproduce landscape and architecture precisely, i.e. almost to portray it. The romantic and picturesque atmosphere radiated by the barrel vaults of the Villa des Brutus in Tivoli, which are overgrown by nature, as well as the huge, sprayed cascades of the waterfalls at Villa Gregoriana near Tivoli, is therefore in neither case contrary to the actual view of the artist. Rather, the special appeal of these representations lies in the fact that they were drawn locally according to nature and transferred from Dies himself to the copper plate. Only the staffage of animals and humans, which give the pictures their liveliness, have been freely invented and purposefully used. Of particular interest are not least the depictions of botany and geological events. With the rise of the natural sciences at the end of the 18th century, the visual artists also developed an awareness for the accurate reproduction of animals, plants and rocks as well as the aesthetics of the naturally reproduced.Marcus Brutus was a lawyer in Rome. His villa, mentioned by Cicero in the 2nd book of "De Oratore", is situated on the road to San Gregorio on the southern slope of Tivoli..


Series: Prospects from Italy (issue 8), by Johann Christian Reinhart, Jakob Wilhelm Mechau and Albert Christoph Dies

Catalogue raisonné: Andresen III, Nr. 19, Fichter Nr. 62

Keywords:

botany, landscape, animals, cattle, sheep, ruin, antiquity, Italy, nature, Classicism, Architecture

Condition:

Very good condition. Slightly discoloured and rubbed on the edge. Slightly wavy in the middle. Occasionally, short, restored marginal tears are visible.


AlDies/D 1

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