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  • Plate 38 (Methode et Invention Nouvelle de Dresser Les Chevaux) by Abraham Van Diepenbeeck

Plate 38 (Methode et Invention Nouvelle de Dresser Les Chevaux)
by Abraham Van Diepenbeeck

Available at Graves International Art

Prints

Engraving

1658

Edition Size: Limited edition unknown, presumed small

Image Size: 15" x 20" inches

Sheet Size: 17" x 21.25" inches

Reference: Reference: Brunet I, 1699; Graesse II:93; Lowndes VI:1663; Mellon 26; Mennessier de la Lance II, p. 246

Unsigned

Condition: Good

$1,800.00

Details — Click to read

An original hand-colored copperplate engraving on laid paper after Dutch artist Abraham van Diepenbeeck (1596-1675) titled “Plate 38 (Methode et Invention Nouvelle de Dresser Les Chevaux)”, 1657-1658. With centerfold as issued. Engraved by Dutch artist Théodorus van Kessel (c.1620-c.1660). Authored by William Cavendish, it comes from the “Methode et Invention Nouvelle de Dresser Les Chevaux” portfolio of 40 engravings of dressage based on illustrations by Flemish painter Abraham van Diepenbeeck. It was originally printed and published in by Jacques Van Meurs in Antwerp, Belgium 1657-1658 in an approximate edition size of 50. It was reissued in London, UK, published by J. Brindley in 1667, 1737, and 1743. Reference: Brunet I, 1699; Graesse II:93; Lowndes VI:1663; Mellon 26; Mennessier de la Lance II, p. 246. Sheet size: 17″ x 21.25″. Image size: 15″ x 20″. Light toning and foxing. Some wear to right side edge. Sheets are separated in margins at top and bottom. Condition commensurate with age. Generally in good condition. Very rare.

William Cavendish Duke of Newcastle (1592-1676) was an Influential and staunch royalist supporting Charles I in battle until the king was overthrown. At that point, Cavendish moved to Paris and then to Antwerp where he developed a new method of training horses, established a riding school in Antwerp and wrote two important books on the subject; this was one of them, “La Methode et Invention Nouvelle de Dresser les Chevaux”. He instructed the art of horse menage which became known in modern times as dressage. He refined the movements of leaps, turns and circles employed on the battlefield into an art form requiring complex precise communication between horse and rider.

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